Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

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Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Redstar » 17 Mar 2014 16:08

There will be a screening of the Jodorowsky's Dune documentary in San Francisco this Thursday, March 20 at 6:30PM. io9 is holding a contest for a pair of tickets to the screening.

io9 is then holding a post-screening meet-up at Bar 333 to discuss the film, which is open to those who haven't attended the screening.

I've entered the contest myself. Hopefully I win. Anyone else in the area? If I do win I would love to meet up with anyone from here to check it out.

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Omphalos » 17 Mar 2014 17:46

I live in Northern California. I would love to go, but I will be in Seattle that day.

Guess it will be DVD for me then.

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Redstar » 17 Mar 2014 18:05

I believe I won, if the E-mail response I received is any indication. :dance:

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Omphalos » 17 Mar 2014 19:15

Congratulations! How about doing a report back on the film, maybe on the meet-up afterwards?

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Jodorowsky's Acolyte » 18 Mar 2014 02:29

Curses! If only I didn't live so far away, in Connecticut. This documentary has been something I've been dying to see ever since I saw its trailer.

Enjoy the screening, Redstar! I, too, await your report of the film. :)
'...all those who took part in the rise and fall of the Dune project learned how to fall one and one thousand times with savage obstinacy until learning how to stand. I remember my old father who, while dying happy, said to me: "My son, in my life, I triumphed because I learned how to fail."' -Alejandro Jodorowsky

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Redstar » 18 Mar 2014 12:27

io9 is holding a Q&A with director Frank Pavich and composer Kurt Stenzel today between 11am and Noon, Pacific Time.

If anyone wants to ask something they should post, otherwise you can go ahead and just read the responses to other questions.

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Jodorowsky's Acolyte » 20 Mar 2014 09:09

It's probably too late for me to ask the questions, but there are still some that gnaw on my mind:

Did Jodorowsky ever intend to have Chani included in his adaptation? Because the snippets of the film's story that he gave to the public suggested that Paul, Jessica, Leto, the Baron, Rabaan, Feyd, Stilgar, Liet, the Fenrings, the Guild, the Fremen, Emperor Shaddam would be in it (I can't remember if Gurney and Duncan were confirmed to be in it).

Jodorowsky's version of events tend to be confusing. According to one story, the rich guy who funded the project pulled out before the project had a chance. In another story, Jodorowsky claims that the project was ended by Hollywood for "not being Hollwood enough," and that the concept art for Jodo's Dune was circulated at Hollywood and used for Star Wars (the last one I find a little hard to believe). What is the definitive version of how the project came down?

Why isn't Jodorowsky's script made available to the public? Is it because of rights disputes, or because Jodorowsky still hopes to make a film of Dune?

Why now, after all this time, did Jodorowsky decide that the story of his attempt to make Dune should be made into a documentary?

How would the worms have been done, if Jodorowsky had got the project off ground? Would he have used Giger's freaky worm painting, or the concept art which we haven't seen yet of one of the other artists on the project?

Will the documentary ever see an international DVD release anytime soon?



I really, really wish they did make the documentary more accessible to the public. :(
'...all those who took part in the rise and fall of the Dune project learned how to fall one and one thousand times with savage obstinacy until learning how to stand. I remember my old father who, while dying happy, said to me: "My son, in my life, I triumphed because I learned how to fail."' -Alejandro Jodorowsky

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Redstar » 20 Mar 2014 16:09

Omphalos wrote:Congratulations! How about doing a report back on the film, maybe on the meet-up afterwards?

I knew you were in California, so was hoping you would be able to attend. I do have an extra ticket and all.

I will most certainly do a report on everything that I can remember. I'm sure that most of Acolyte's questions will be covered to some extent, especially since the documentary interviews only a handful of key players rather than a range of positions.

Also, I do know that the film is set to come to DVD and Blu-Ray, although I'm not sure about region differences. There should also be screenings in indie/arthouse theaters if anyone lives near one and can make requests.

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby DuneFishUK » 21 Mar 2014 15:10

Nice one, look forward to the write-up Redstar! :)

Jodorowsky's Acolyte wrote:Would he have used Giger's freaky worm painting

Assume you mean the willy worm? That was for Ridley Scott in 1979.

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby inhuien » 21 Mar 2014 17:05

YUMMY
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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Redstar » 21 Mar 2014 17:17

The film was very good. I brought my girlfriend who has never read the books, nor is familiar with the franchise in any form; despite this she enjoyed the experience. The interviews were engaging and informative and in every case impassioned.

I don't want to spoil everything contained since it's a film that I highly recommend for everyone here, but I will share some highlights.

    The documentary opens with a recap of Jodorowsky's film career. This chapter is about ten minutes long before the film movies into Dune, so it only serves as context for his artistic sensibility.

    Jodorowsky's early films were very experimental and ridiculous. Lots of nudity, crapping gold feces and drugs. It's important to note that Jodorowsky was probably the first person to do anything like this on film, which (I guess) makes it important.

    Jodorowsky's intent with the film was to create a prophet that would push humanity into a spiritual awakening. He wanted the film to elicit the effects of drug hallucinations without having to actually take drugs.

    How the different creatives and actors came onto the project is discussed with an interesting and often hilarious story for each.

    Everyone brought on had to be a "spiritual warrior."

    Jodorowsky sought Moebius due to his work on the French cowboy comic Blueberry, which had amazing camera angles. So, Moebius not only did the concept art, but also the storyboards. He was intended to be the Director of Photography.

    They met with Douglas Trumbull of 2001: A Space Odyssey, but Jodorowsky felt that he was too technical to realize the spirituality of the effects. He was also too vain in regards to his own work. Dan O'Bannon of Dark Star replaced him.

    Giger is horrifying. He looks and sounds like a troll that will devour your children. The audience was audibly unnerved each time he came on screen.

    Jodorowsky's own son, Brontis, was to play Paul. Brontis trained for six hours a day for two weeks in various martial arts and weaponry to portray Paul. Jodorowsky wanted Brontis to "become" Paul. He suggests that he wanted to forcefully evolve his son's spirituality.

    Feyd-Rautha was going to be played by yet another famous musician whose costumes were so ridiculous and feminine that they make Sting in the metal Speedo look intimidating by comparison.

    Almost no one on the production, Jodorowsky included, had read the novel. None of them have even now. The exception was Amanda Lear. She was Dali's muse and confidant. She was a huge fan of both Dune and Frank's work in general.

    Pink Floyd was set to score Duke Leto's theme while French band Magma would score the Harkonnen theme. Jodorowsky described Magma's music as "violent," "military" and "terrible."

    The film would have opened with a long shot inspired by Orson Welle's opening to Touch of Evil. The shot would begin at the furthest reaches of the universe before pulling closer and closer to Arrakis. Epic space battles would be shown between the Empire and "spice pirates." This shot is recreated using the original storyboards.

    The ending of Lynch's version certainly demands criticism for betraying the core themes and infrastructure of Frank's universe, but once you realize that Jodorowsky planned to do the same thing it's more easy to forgive. To be fair, Jodorowsky wanted to go even further.

    Lynch's adaptation is only discussed for about five minutes. Most of the people were under the impression that Dino De Laurentiis "stole" it from them.

    Jodorowsky was physically ill when he found out about Lynch's adaptation. This was only made worse because he respected Lynch and felt that he was the only other person who could do it. He initially refused to see the film, but then his son convinced him that he owed it to Dune as a "spiritual warrior."

    The more Jodorowsky watched the film the better he felt since it was "terrible." He was happy that it failed since he felt that only his vision was right.

    Jodorowsky describes his vision in relation to Frank's actual work with a very colorful metaphor. Everyone burst out laughing when he said it. I imagine most of you will agree.

    Those interviewed list films that were supposedly inspired by Jodorowsky's Dune. Some of those mentioned are a stretch while others, like Alien, Prometheus and (to some extent) Blade Runner are very clear.

    Many of the themes, concepts and visuals would be recycled in his The Incal and Metabarons graphic novels, of which The Incal is supposedly being adapted to film.

    Jodorowsky hopes that this documentary will spark interest in his vision for Dune and that it will be adapted into an animated film.

I am definitely purchasing this film once it is out. It's just that good. It gives insight into what Jodorowsky was attempting to do not just with Frank's universe but with film and art in general. You can't help but feel inspired by his passion. Everyone truly felt that they were making the next step in cinematic science fiction.

I recommend everyone here see it. Go in with a group of people that are ideally familiar with the Dune franchise and film in general. If you have a theater playing it near you be sure to make an effort to attend.
Last edited by Redstar on 23 Mar 2014 16:35, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Serkanner » 22 Mar 2014 19:01

As a Dune collector, I also need to have it.

@RedStar ... I am not sure the film will be released on DVD in Europe. Could you keep us informed when the film is released on DVD so I can order a copy? Much obliged.
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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Naïve mind » 23 Mar 2014 02:38

Redstar wrote:Jodorowsky's early films were very experimental and ridiculous. Lots of nudity, crapping gold feces and drugs. It's important to note that Jodorowsky was probably the first person to do anything like this on film, which (I guess) makes it important.


Have you actually seen them? I won't dispute that they're ridiculous, but they're also colourful, quirky and fresh. I didn't understand why anyone would hand a multi-million dollar Sci-Fi franchise to a, well, unproven nutcase like Jodorowsky until I saw The Holy Mountain.

I think the guy missed his calling as a cult leader (he essentially ran the film crew of the Holy Mountain like a cult when the budget ran out), and he obviously understands the effects of charisma. He might not have been such a bad match for the film.

(And think about it, if Jodo-Dune had happened, we probably would've had a big-budget, faithful Hollywood adaptation in the mid-90s)

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Redstar » 23 Mar 2014 03:34

If I'm remembering correctly, Jodorowsky said that they bought the rights for very little money. They actually didn't mention what interaction, if any, they had with Frank.

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Jodorowsky's Acolyte » 23 Mar 2014 16:14

Jodorowsky's early films were very experimental and ridiculous. Lots of nudity, crapping gold feces and drugs. It's important to note that Jodorowsky was probably the first person to do anything like this on film, which (I guess) makes it important.


I bought the entire collection of his films, because I wanted to study what his films were like just to get a sense how he might have filmed Dune. Surprisingly... His films are up my alley, though I haven't been able to finish them. I've watch the first parts of El Topo and Holy Mountain. The idea behind El Topo is awesome: a mystic gunslinger and his naked son wander a surreal Mexican rendition of an Old West setting, who does battle with fetishistic bandits, and undergoes a symbolical metamorphosis during their journeys. I last left it after the main character freed a monk village from the deviant desperados and castrates the self-centered and fat commander who's too fat to pull himself up. I left Holy Mountain at the part when the main character is horrified that his image is replicated into countless Jesus on the crucifix replicas, and destroys them. I got to give Jodorowsky credit: he makes use of variety of people you don't see in mainstream films, from dwarves, giants, amputees, and makes them integral to his films.

How the different creatives and actors came onto the project is discussed with an interesting and often hilarious story for each.


I always wondered how David Carradine was approached. I think he would've made a good choice for Liet Kynes, despite his various faults. I'm a fan of his work in both Kung Fu shows and Circle of Iron, though at the same time annoyed with how he played Kwai Chang Caine and how awkward his martial arts choreography was. Despite his shortcomings, he pulled off the wise mystic character well. I could imagine him applying the personality of his Blind Seer character from Circle of Iron for Kynes: wise, yet a hardass.

Though he also might have played Duke Leto. In that case, he would probably apply more of a Kwai Chang Caine styled performance to it.


They met with Douglas Trumbull of 2001: A Space Odyssey, but Jodorowsky felt that he was too technical to realize the spirituality of the effects. He was also too vain in regards to his own work. Dan O'Bannon of Dark Star replaced him.


In his essay about the attempt to do Dune, Jodorowsky more or less claimed it was because Trumball was a self-satisfied dick.

For the special effects, thanks to the capacity which Michel Seydoux gave me, I was able to refuse Douglas Trumbull... I was unable to swallow his vanity, his airs of business leader and his exorbitant prices. Like a good American, he played to scorn the project and tried to complex us while making us wait while speaking with us at the same time as with ten people on the telephone and finally by showing us superb machines which he tried to improve. Tired of all this comedy, I left to research a young talent. It is said to me that in L.A. it was like looking for a needle in a haystack. I saw in a modest festival of cinema by science fiction amateurs, a film made without means that I found marvellous: Dark Star.


I think it was admirable of Jodorowsky to approach Dan O'Bannon for the special effects a film others probably didn't respect at the time. It encouraged him to go onto Alien, and the effects in that film were a grand leap beyond Dark Star's.



Pink Floyd was set to score Duke Leto's them while French band Magma would score the Harkonnen theme. Jodorowsky described Magma's music as "violent," "military" and "terrible."


Just checked Magma out. Jodorowsky has quite the musical taste. It actually might have worked as Harkonnen music.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Avbp4LaPazM

Of course, Pink Floyd just had to be the top choice for Dune's soundtrack. From songs like "Echoes," "Shine on You Crazy Diamond," and "Welcome to the Machine," you totally get a Dune vibe from those songs. Any of you guys ever saw Pink Floyd's concert film Live at Pompeii? Their rendition of "Echoes" is freaking sweet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGwPSPIhohk

Though it makes you wonder if they were allowed to do lyrics, what kind of lyrics Roger Waters would have used. (He pretty much made himself intellectual-poet master of the band ever since Syd Barret left).

I don't think The Wall was released by then, but I totally see Pink's Hammer Fascist Party-themed songs like "In the Flesh?," "Run Like Hell," and "Waiting for the Worms" to be very Harkonnen-like.

The film would have opened with a long shot inspired by Orson Welle's opening to Touch of Evil. The shot would begin at the furthest reaches of the universe before pulling closer and closer to Arrakis. Epic space battles would be shown between the Empire and "spice pirates." This shot is recreated using the original storyboards.


Another favorite film of mine. I got to respected Jodorowsky for wanting to expand Dune into some far out psychedelic space opera to 11. Even though we know that space pirates wouldn't be much of a threat, because everyone travels by Guild Heighliners, and those ships are the only way people can travel around planets anyway. (Unless the space pirates just cause damage around the individual planets they live in rather than in the middle of space). Maybe Jodorowsky was planning to give his space pirates space folding technology as well, which would allow them to turn up on any installation they wanted to destroy instantly. That would be insane.

The ending of Lynch's version certainly demands criticism for betraying the core themes and infrastructure of Frank's universe, but once you realize that Jodorowsky planned to do the same thing it's more easy to forgive. To be fair, Jodorowsky wanted to go even further.


I'm guessing his insane ending had to do with these snippets from his script summary.

the Galaxy itself is encircled by
an insuperable Magnetic Wall.
No one could cross it.
Not having anything more
to discover,
to conquer,
Man delivers himself completely
to the pleasure,
give his capacity to machines
and degenerates in the luxury.


Paul, while mixing political and religion, becomes the
Divine Chief of the Fremen.
At their head, he destroys the galactic armies.
He discovers that the Spice cannot grow,
without the Giant Worms.
He invents a method to eliminate the Worms.
Having the capacity to control Spice,
he becomes Master of Spice.
Being a Master of Spice,
He becomes Master of the Galaxy.

Paul, New Emperor,
leaves in a Galactic Crusade
to change, once more, Civilization.
He succeeds, with all the human ones, to form
a Collective Being
and releases Man
of the prison, Space and Time.


I remember that Frank said in his introduction to short story collection Eye that his criticism of the movie is that "Paul is a man playing god, not a man that could make it rain." Of course Jodorowsky would lean more into making Dune into the realization of the messianic myth while missing the criticism of manipulative heroism. It seems that not only does Paul make it rain in Jodorowsky's vision: Paul is potentially going to destroy the Worms and the Spice forever, and thus somehow destroys the Magnetic Barrier which surrounds the Known Universe in the process, right? That's so heavy, man.

Almost no one on the production, Jodorowsky included, had read the novel. None of them have even now. The exception was Amanda Lear. She was Dali's muse and confidant. She was a huge fan of both Dune and Frank's work in general.


Even if he still hasn't read it, he still gets the core essentials of Dune's story well enough according to his summary, and was planning to use what seems to be ALL the characters of the novel including the Fenrings. He may being changing the contexts of the characters actions and motivations, but that's pretty impressive for a guy who didn't read the book to want to include characters which other directors cut out from the book.

Jodorowsky's own son, Brontis, was to play Paul. Brontis trained for six hours a day for two weeks in various martial arts and weaponry to portray Paul. Jodorowsky wanted Brontis to "become" Paul. He suggests that he wanted to forcefully evolve his son's spirituality.


I remember Jodorowsky planned to play Duke Leto himself. From reading this, it sounds like Jodorowksy wanted to guide his son into becoming a real life Kwisatz Handerach and Mua'dib.

Those interviewed list films that were supposedly inspired by Jodorowsky's Dune. Some of those mentioned are a stretch while others, like Alien, Prometheus and (to some extent) Blade Runner are very clear.


They didn't by any chance try to include Star Wars as one of them, did they?

Me, I liked to fight for Dune. Almost all the battles were won, but the war was lost. The project was sabotaged in Hollywood. It was French and not American. Its message was not "enough Hollywood". There were intrigues, plundering. The story-board circulated among all the large studios. Later, the visual aspect of Star Wars resembled our style.


I don't know where Jodorowsky thought they looked similar. Star Wars' style looks nothing like the concept art for Jodorowsky's Dune. Star Wars has got more of a Flash Gordon/Kurosawa/WWII movie vibe to it. Jodorowsky's Dune, on the other hand, is a Mexican/Eastern European psychedelic fusion of Flash Gordon, Conan the Barbarian, Tarot Cards, drug-induced imagery, and whole lots of other things. As much he'd like to think it, Star Wars does not at all resemble the combined styles of Foss, Moebius, or Giger.

Jodorowsky hopes that this documentary will spark interest in his vision for Dune and that it will be adapted into an animated film.


That would probably be the best format for it. It's just me, but I kind of like to see it be done as a CG interactive movie computer game. If only because an interactive movie was recently done by the guys behind MST3K called Darkstar. The Dark Star film guys were to do the effects for the original film, perhaps the Darkstar developer could do the effects for Jodo's vision? Nah. I'm just being non-sequitur as usual.

And thanks very much Redstar for sharing this with us. I envy the opportunity you got to see this film, and I hope it does get made into DVD. Thanks again for considering the questions I asked before.

DuneFishUK wrote:
Jodorowsky's Acolyte wrote:Would he have used Giger's freaky worm painting

Assume you mean the willy worm? That was for Ridley Scott in 1979.


It was also the result from Giger's concept art for a film project that ended up not using his stuff called Killer Condom, based upon a graphic novel around that time. Hence, the worm acting as a condom for the giant obsidian penis. (Suggesting perhaps that they were living cinnamon condoms from another life, supposedly?) Although I wish the concept art for the worms Jodorowsky intended to used were shown to the public, I think that Giger's worm would have been freaking awesome to use in the film.

inhuien wrote:YUMMY
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Still one of my favorite concepts of Shai-Hulud. :D
'...all those who took part in the rise and fall of the Dune project learned how to fall one and one thousand times with savage obstinacy until learning how to stand. I remember my old father who, while dying happy, said to me: "My son, in my life, I triumphed because I learned how to fail."' -Alejandro Jodorowsky

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Serkanner » 23 Mar 2014 18:38

... a whole lot of text. And you mentioned you haven't finished watching the movies.

???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

What am I supposed to make of your comments?
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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Jodorowsky's Acolyte » 23 Mar 2014 19:28

Serkanner wrote:... a whole lot of text. And you mentioned you haven't finished watching the movies.

???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

What am I supposed to make of your comments?


You don't need to make anything out of what I wrote. Just drink your Spice Beer, and enjoy the sunset. :wink:
'...all those who took part in the rise and fall of the Dune project learned how to fall one and one thousand times with savage obstinacy until learning how to stand. I remember my old father who, while dying happy, said to me: "My son, in my life, I triumphed because I learned how to fail."' -Alejandro Jodorowsky

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Redstar » 24 Mar 2014 01:52

Naïve mind wrote:
Redstar wrote:Jodorowsky's early films were very experimental and ridiculous. Lots of nudity, crapping gold feces and drugs. It's important to note that Jodorowsky was probably the first person to do anything like this on film, which (I guess) makes it important.

Have you actually seen them? I won't dispute that they're ridiculous, but they're also colourful, quirky and fresh. I didn't understand why anyone would hand a multi-million dollar Sci-Fi franchise to a, well, unproven nutcase like Jodorowsky until I saw The Holy Mountain.

I really want to see El Topo, but feel I wouldn't get the full experience unless it was at a midnight screening in an actual theater. They haven't screened it in California for several years, but following the documentary I imagine something might come up soon.

Jodorowsky's Acolyte wrote:I always wondered how David Carradine was approached. I think he would've made a good choice for Liet Kynes, despite his various faults.

Jodorowsky has a story for how he approached all of the creatives and actors, Carradine included. Carradine was slated to portray Duke Leto.

Jodorowsky's Acolyte wrote:
Redstar wrote:Those interviewed list films that were supposedly inspired by Jodorowsky's Dune. Some of those mentioned are a stretch while others, like Alien, Prometheus and (to some extent) Blade Runner are very clear.

They didn't by any chance try to include Star Wars as one of them, did they?

All that was said about Star Wars was that it changed how audiences perceived science-fiction and that if Jodorowsky's Dune had been released first it would have resulted in a much different perception of the genre. They also said that they wanted to do things with special effects that Lucas wouldn't even attempt with the prequel trilogy; that's how great the scope of the project was.

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Naib » 31 Mar 2014 12:36

Interesting article on boingboing

http://boingboing.net/2014/03/28/dune.html

The images alone make it worth checking out.

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Freakzilla » 31 Mar 2014 12:47

While I'm kinda glad Jodorowsky's Dune never got made, I'd love to see that storyboard.
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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Ampoliros » 21 Apr 2014 13:22

SUNUVA...

Checked to see when the local Art Cinema would be screening Jodorowsky's Dune. It ended Yesterday...(3-day run.)
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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Ampoliros » 25 Apr 2014 14:12

If you look in all the right places...the film is available online.

And its pretty damn good, really makes you wish they had made it.

I would hope with the interest the documentary has drummed up they will at least print the storyboards.
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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby trang » 27 Apr 2014 02:27

Watched the documentary yesterday afternoon. It wasn't what I expected and that much more.

Jodorowsky's Passion and vision are very very apparent in his dialogue throughout the movie. I feel much the same way... wanting a movie version... much the same way. His anger and expression about the paper money, quote "This...shit"...limiting the vision... hit me right in the heart, feel the same way. He is a charismatic guy, and despite the warnings of FH... I would probably drink the Coolaide if he or FH were pouring.

I'm not much into the previous two movies he made (not my style) but I fully respect his artistic vision.

What was most astonishing to me, at least from what I saw, He never read the books. How does he have dreams and passion on such a level without reading the books? IF I'm wrong here I apologize.

Im sure I would respect his interpretation of the story, and that massive book of panels (That would be fraking awesome to have one to preserve) was outstanding. Im sure him following panel by panel describing the movie in his mind would have been fascinating.


I am pretty sure I am glad his version didnt make it to Theatrical release, I think it would have overpowered the audience and maybe been a negative for the book and series.

He was very high on David Lynch as an artist that's for sure, but obviously thought his version was a failure. Maybe at the box office, but I liked it.


I am 1000 percent behind doing his as well as a version closer to FH's version in animation (comic book or Movie)... Totally do able.

It was a pleasure to watch the documentary, Its great to know Jodorowsky and his vision and history.
"Long Live the Fighters", "Dragon.....the other white meat."

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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Ampoliros » 28 Apr 2014 00:50

Started reading "The Metabarons" that he did with Moebius. Its rather bizarre, but very well done and the art is incredible. I'm amazed I'd never heard of it before, or that its not more widely distributed.
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Re: Jodorowsky's Dune Documentary Screening in San Francisco

Postby Freakzilla » 28 Apr 2014 07:37

trang wrote:What was most astonishing to me, at least from what I saw, He never read the books. How does he have dreams and passion on such a level without reading the books? IF I'm wrong here I apologize.


That's also what I heard from another friend who saw the documentarty.

But I swear that I read somewhere that he read it in one night.
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Paul of Dune was so bad it gave me a seizure that dislocated both of my shoulders and prolapsed my anus.
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